Difference between revisions of "Gospel Topics: "Even after 1852, at least two black Mormons continued to hold the priesthood""

 
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Latest revision as of 21:26, 29 November 2018

FAIR Answers Wiki Table of Contents

Gospel Topics: "Even after 1852, at least two black Mormons continued to hold the priesthood"

Gospel Topics on LDS.org:

Even after 1852, at least two black Mormons continued to hold the priesthood. When one of these men, Elijah Abel, petitioned to receive his temple endowment in 1879, his request was denied. Jane Manning James, a faithful black member who crossed the plains and lived in Salt Lake City until her death in 1908, similarly asked to enter the temple; she was allowed to perform baptisms for the dead for her ancestors but was not allowed to participate in other ordinances. The curse of Cain was often put forward as justification for the priesthood and temple restrictions. Around the turn of the century, another explanation gained currency: blacks were said to have been less than fully valiant in the premortal battle against Lucifer and, as a consequence, were restricted from priesthood and temple blessings.[1] —(Click here to continue)

Notes

  1. "Race and the Priesthood," Gospel Topics on LDS.org. (2013)